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    Originally posted by RhodyYanksFan View Post

    Here's a start.

    FDYdazvWUAIsw2I?format=jpg&name=small.jpg


    USA - great at spending money. Terrible at any sort of return for that money.

    Spend the most in defense - haven't won a war since the 1940s.
    Spend the most on healthcare - by every metric we're in the bottom third of the world
    Spend the most on education - by every metric we're in the bottom third of the world
    Wasted 20 years in Vietnam, got our butte kicked. Wasted 20 years in Afghanistan.’10 in Iraq. When it comes to killing innocent women and children, no one asks about the cost. Trying to feed children, you are a socialist pig

    Comment


      Sounds kind of like a hate crime:

      A now-deleted Facebook account belonging to Darrell Brooks Jr., 39, showed the alleged killer had encouraged knocking 'white ppl [the f**k] out' and also appeared to support the controversial Black Hebrew Israelites.

      Brooks was charged on Tuesday with five counts of first-degree intentional homicide and is expected to face more charges.

      Police are yet to determine the motive behind the deadly rampage, however, records reveal Brooks is a career criminal with a rap sheet dating back to 1999 and had been bailed twice this year.

      Facebook posts also show the amateur rapper, who went by his stage name, MathBoi Fly, had shared a series of links and memes relating to race and white privilege in June 2020, when protests erupted over the death of George Floyd.

      Five of the six victims - all white - who died on Sunday were aged 52 to 82 and part of a Waukesha club known as the Dancing Grannies.

      In a post from June 9, 2020, Brooks wrote: 'LEARNED ND TAUGHT BEHAVIOR!! so when we start bakk knokkin white people TF out ion wanna hear it...the old white ppl 2, KNOKK DEM TF OUT!! PERIOD..' followed by a middle finger and expletive emoji.




      https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...te-people.html
      Calmer than you are

      7/30/2017: The day the Minnesota Twins bought a prospect from the New York Yankees.

      Comment


        Originally posted by JL25and3 View Post

        Besides, we won Grenada.
        What about Iraq? Assuming one includes unjustified conflicts.

        The war against terrorism should probably count too...
        Polite Red Sox fan

        Comment


          Our military complex receives zero oversight. Zero auditing to make sure money isn’t being wasted. Now a mother trying to feed her children? We must spend every dollar we can to make sure she isn’t feeding them the pricier fresh vegetables!

          Comment


            Originally posted by HfxBob View Post

            What about Iraq? Assuming one includes unjustified conflicts.

            The war against terrorism should probably count too...
            Terrorism is very much alive and well.
            Russian warship, go **** yourself

            Comment


              Originally posted by JL25and3 View Post

              Terrorism is very much alive and well.
              And always will be. The question is whether the carnage has been mitigated.
              Polite Red Sox fan

              Comment


                Good read.

                As Britain is only a distant province of America’s soft-power empire, it’s been relatively easy to turn the volume down on Kyle Rittenhouse discourse. Even so, it’s been unsettling to watch the same events assembled into two irreconcilable stories.

                In one, a white supremacist shot anti-racism protesters in cold blood, and was acquitted because of his skin colour. In the other, a teenager tried to defend a community from violence, and ended up shooting two criminal lunatics in self-defence.

                But why are these stories so irreconcilable? It’s a good rule of thumb that where people find it impossible to agree, it’s usually because there’s a fundamental difference in their assumptions about the world.
                Today, though, the boot is on the other foot. The high-status view among contemporary elites is unmistakeably Team Rousseau.

                At the tiniest scale, it’s expressed in the school of parenting that believes it’s wrong or even cruel to teach children how to live. I’ve written before about the currently popular ideas of ‘attachment parenting’ and ‘gentle parenting’, which emphasise self-discovery in a loving environment over routine, authority or punishment — and about how these views skew wealthy and liberal.

                In education settings, the same idea appears as ‘child-centred pedagogy’, an approach that emphasises individual pathways and discovery over rote learning and teachers as authority figures. And at the biggest scale, it crops up as the claim that all the root causes of crime are external to humans: poverty, trauma, discrimination and so on. From this perspective, if we could only replace policing with tailored community services that eliminated these root causes, there would no longer be any crime.

                Even outbreaks of mass public disorder are treated by Team Rousseau as an unfortunate-yet-understandable response to bad governance: when BLM protesters in Baltimore toppled a statue of Christopher Columbus last year, the Democrat politician Nanci Pelosi responded by shrugging it off as a natural expression of that community’s wishes. If the community doesn’t want the statue, she said, “the statue shouldn’t be there”. From this vantage point, public unrest is something akin to the weather: a naturally-occurring phenomenon in which leaders must strive to create the conditions for goodness, or else “people will do what they do”.

                If angry 18th century moralists burned Rousseau’s book on education, today the moral majority is more likely to dogpile people who disagree with the belief that we’re all born good. Katherine Birbalsingh, headteacher of ‘Britain’s strictest school’, Michaela Community School in London, recently faced demands that she be fired after she referenced ‘original sin’ in the context of teaching. From the Team Original Sin perspective, as Michaela’s deputy head Jonathan Porter argued last year, providing empathy and interesting lessons won’t guarantee you good classroom behaviour. To Porter, children aren’t so much naturally good as capable of being habituated to the good. But that, he suggests, means making clear statements about what you believe to be good, setting rules on that basis, and enforcing them consistently.
                As a child, Rousseau himself wasn’t allowed to play with other children. And it’s conceivable that more daily rough-and-tumble with his peers might have tempered the rosy view of natural childish virtue presented in Emile. When people who have led sheltered lives apply Team Rousseau beliefs in less rarefied settings, the result isn’t always as salutary as hoped. Even innocent experiments and self-discovery can impact negatively on others — especially where the experiment (innocent or otherwise) is in how far you can push one of your classmates.

                For Team Original Sin, Birbalsingh advocates dealing with such schoolyard conflicts by imposing norms of public order: that is, ‘tight behaviour systems’ and ‘high expectations’. For Team Rousseau, though, it’s less clear what to do.

                Research suggests that empathy-based ‘restorative justice’ approaches to school discipline yield mixed results at best. And when applied to law and order, Team Rousseau likewise runs aground on the problem of those who refuse to be rehabilitated. In San Francisco, as the focus of law and order has shifted to rehabilitation, incidences of burglary are rocketing — a fact that seems down to a minority of repeat offenders.

                What can be done about this, especially where police no longer get involved? One plausible consequence is rising vigilantism. We can’t know definitively what motivated one teenager with an assault rifle to travel to a riot zone; perhaps he really was just attracted to the mayhem, and looking for a reason to join in. Or perhaps he thought he was making a last, heroic stand for order and in defence of those unable to defend themselves.
                https://unherd.com/2021/11/why-anarc...me-to-america/
                Calmer than you are

                7/30/2017: The day the Minnesota Twins bought a prospect from the New York Yankees.

                Comment


                  Originally posted by YankeePride1967 View Post
                  Our military complex receives zero oversight. Zero auditing to make sure money isn’t being wasted.
                  I spent close to a quarter century in the military, and have been a contractor to the "military complex" for close to 20 years. Your statement here could not be further from the truth. Civilian oversight of the military is the basic foundation of the Department of Defense. And, as a contractor, my payroll, my supply chain, and my products are ALL audited by DoD.

                  I am an advocate of reduced military spending. But I have long insisted that any decrease needs to happen following a return of our soldiers, sailors, airmen, marines and guardians to the United States. As long as we insist on maintaining a global presence, we owe the troops the resources they need to conduct military operations. Reduce our presence in Europe and Asia, and you can start assessing the need for updated weapons systems. But not until then.

                  Zero oversight? Zero auditing? Please stop making things up.

                  "But what people tend to forget...is that being a Yankee is as much about character as it is about performance; as much about who you are as what you do."
                  - President Barack Obama

                  Comment


                    Originally posted by Maynerd View Post
                    I spent close to a quarter century in the military, and have been a contractor to the "military complex" for close to 20 years. Your statement here could not be further from the truth. Civilian oversight of the military is the basic foundation of the Department of Defense. And, as a contractor, my payroll, my supply chain, and my products are ALL audited by DoD.

                    I am an advocate of reduced military spending. But I have long insisted that any decrease needs to happen following a return of our soldiers, sailors, airmen, marines and guardians to the United States. As long as we insist on maintaining a global presence, we owe the troops the resources they need to conduct military operations. Reduce our presence in Europe and Asia, and you can start assessing the need for updated weapons systems. But not until then.

                    Zero oversight? Zero auditing? Please stop making things up.
                    It’s not zero but money just disappearing seems to be a recurring theme in defense spending. The point is the military budget is badly bloated but you never hear a Republican Congressman (outside of maybe Rand Paul) who ever once questions where we’ll get the money to pay for all that defense pork.

                    but god forbid we try to feed hungry children, improve education, or provide health care for our citizenry and BAM WHERE WILL WE GET THE MONEY FOR ALL THIS. Hmmm…maybe we could just take most of it from the defense department.
                    Baseball is life;
                    the rest is just details.

                    Comment


                      Originally posted by Yankee Tripper View Post
                      It’s not zero but money just disappearing seems to be a recurring theme in defense spending.
                      Do you think this is unique to defense?

                      It's a recurring theme in GOVERNMENT spending.


                      "But what people tend to forget...is that being a Yankee is as much about character as it is about performance; as much about who you are as what you do."
                      - President Barack Obama

                      Comment


                        I wish these elected officials would stop with the “where are we going to get the money” nonsense. The money comes from the US government. It’s either printed or made up in electronic records. There is no US government piggy bank where they take money out of to pay for stuff.
                        Let the kids play.

                        Comment


                          Originally posted by Yankee Tripper View Post
                          It’s not zero but money just disappearing seems to be a recurring theme in defense spending. The point is the military budget is badly bloated but you never hear a Republican Congressman (outside of maybe Rand Paul) who ever once questions where we’ll get the money to pay for all that defense pork.

                          but god forbid we try to feed hungry children, improve education, or provide health care for our citizenry and BAM WHERE WILL WE GET THE MONEY FOR ALL THIS. Hmmm…maybe we could just take most of it from the defense department.
                          This/ always money for war. To hell people they can starve. What a pathetic soulless country we are. The military is the biggest scam going. Last time anyone fought for our freedom was 1945. Now it is for oil and to make Wall Street happy

                          Comment


                            Originally posted by Maynerd View Post
                            I spent close to a quarter century in the military, and have been a contractor to the "military complex" for close to 20 years. Your statement here could not be further from the truth. Civilian oversight of the military is the basic foundation of the Department of Defense. And, as a contractor, my payroll, my supply chain, and my products are ALL audited by DoD.

                            I am an advocate of reduced military spending. But I have long insisted that any decrease needs to happen following a return of our soldiers, sailors, airmen, marines and guardians to the United States. As long as we insist on maintaining a global presence, we owe the troops the resources they need to conduct military operations. Reduce our presence in Europe and Asia, and you can start assessing the need for updated weapons systems. But not until then.

                            Zero oversight? Zero auditing? Please stop making things up.
                            Or take the money away and let them figure it out. That's how nearly every other gov agency works. Military is not special and those troops will be fine.

                            Comment


                              Travis McMichael guilty on all counts. Greg McDaniel guilty on all counts except malicious murder and Bryan guilty on 7 of 9 charges. Expect an angry statement from Trump but justice finally served

                              Comment


                                Keith Boykin@keithboykin
                                Travis McMichael and Greg Michael found guilty of all charges. William R. Bryan guilty of felony murder, not guilty of other charges in murder of Ahmaud Arbery.
                                At least we aren't looking the other way at lynching. Today.

                                Comment

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