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    Originally posted by jnewmark View Post
    Bauer Arbitration proceedings start in two weeks.
    Have they even settled Judge's Salary Arbitration yet?
    http://vimel.ru/e6748

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      Originally posted by Donnybaseball72 View Post

      Have they even settled Judge's Salary Arbitration yet?
      I think I heard a May 23rd date.


      edit: actually June 22nd, per Joel Sherman

      I suppose there's a chance for an extension to be signed before then? If Judge's side wins the arbitration hearing, the Yanks will probably have to pay a higher AAV on a long term deal. If they bump up their offer to around $250M - maybe he signs?
      Last edited by sjb23; 05-28-22, 12:32 PM.
      "Somebody once asked me if I ever went up to the plate trying to hit a home run. I said, 'Sure, every time.'" -- Mickey Mantle

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        The Astros are quietly off to a better-than-expected start. They're 16 games over .500 @ 34-18 - only 3 games behind the Yanks for best AL record.

        I'm looking forward to the 5 games the Yanks have against them in a few weeks (4 @ YS) - it'll be a very nice test for our team.
        "Somebody once asked me if I ever went up to the plate trying to hit a home run. I said, 'Sure, every time.'" -- Mickey Mantle

        Comment


          I just saw something in the Cardinals-Cubs game that I've never seen before and have wondered why seemingly no one else tried it before.

          First, let me set the scene. Tie game, top of the 9th, Cards have men on 1st and 2nd, 2 outs. Gorman hits a single to left, which should have scored the lead runner, Sosa, easily. But Sosa accidentally misses 3rd while rounding it, and what's more, he can tell the ump is looking right at him, so he pulls up and goes back to 3rd. Now it's bases loaded.

          Goldschmidt up, first pitch, he grounds to short. Shortstop flips to 2nd for the force. And Gorman, the trailing runner, runs through the bag at 2nd instead of sliding. He's out anyway, but ...

          I've always wondered, why don't more players do that in that situation? You obviously don't want to do that with no one out or one man out because you're not allowed to overrun 2nd like you can at first. But think about it: one of the reasons you're told not to slide into 1st is because you can get there faster by running upright. Well, you can get to 2nd faster by running upright as well. If you see the shortstop throwing to 2nd for the inning-ending forceout, your only chance to score the man from 3rd is to be safe at 2nd, if only for a few seconds. By the time they run over to tag you, you've bought time for the man on 3rd to score.

          The only drawback I can think of is if the SS makes a throw that's slightly wild, pulling the fielder off the bag but not throwing it into right field, you've given up an out that wouldn't have happened if you slid. But that happens a lot less often than an accurate throw. If you need to get that 9th inning go-ahead or game-tying run home with 2 outs, why not do it?
          I hid in the clouded wrath of the crowd, when they said "sit down" I stood up.

          Comment


            Originally posted by HelloNewman View Post
            I just saw something in the Cardinals-Cubs game that I've never seen before and have wondered why seemingly no one else tried it before.

            First, let me set the scene. Tie game, top of the 9th, Cards have men on 1st and 2nd, 2 outs. Gorman hits a single to left, which should have scored the lead runner, Sosa, easily. But Sosa accidentally misses 3rd while rounding it, and what's more, he can tell the ump is looking right at him, so he pulls up and goes back to 3rd. Now it's bases loaded.

            Goldschmidt up, first pitch, he grounds to short. Shortstop flips to 2nd for the force. And Gorman, the trailing runner, runs through the bag at 2nd instead of sliding. He's out anyway, but ...

            I've always wondered, why don't more players do that in that situation? You obviously don't want to do that with no one out or one man out because you're not allowed to overrun 2nd like you can at first. But think about it: one of the reasons you're told not to slide into 1st is because you can get there faster by running upright. Well, you can get to 2nd faster by running upright as well. If you see the shortstop throwing to 2nd for the inning-ending forceout, your only chance to score the man from 3rd is to be safe at 2nd, if only for a few seconds. By the time they run over to tag you, you've bought time for the man on 3rd to score.

            The only drawback I can think of is if the SS makes a throw that's slightly wild, pulling the fielder off the bag but not throwing it into right field, you've given up an out that wouldn't have happened if you slid. But that happens a lot less often than an accurate throw. If you need to get that 9th inning go-ahead or game-tying run home with 2 outs, why not do it?
            Because you can’t run more than 3 feet from the base to avoid being tagged? If Gorman ran thru the bag the likelihood of him running less than 3 feet past the second base bag to avoid being tagged is almost nil. Imagine a yardstick around the base. So he’s out. Well before even the speediest runner can score?

            Comment


              Originally posted by Portbb View Post

              Because you can’t run more than 3 feet from the base to avoid being tagged? If Gorman ran thru the bag the likelihood of him running less than 3 feet past the second base bag to avoid being tagged is almost nil. Imagine a yardstick around the base. So he’s out. Well before even the speediest runner can score?
              The runner on third is running a similar distance to the runner on 1st. So unless the guy on 3rd is markedly slower than the guy on 1st (he was not in this case), the run should be across home plate by the time the guy running to second breaks the "yardstick" barrier.

              I hid in the clouded wrath of the crowd, when they said "sit down" I stood up.

              Comment


                Originally posted by HelloNewman View Post
                The runner on third is running a similar distance to the runner on 1st. So unless the guy on 3rd is markedly slower than the guy on 1st (he was not in this case), the run should be across home plate by the time the guy running to second breaks the "yardstick" barrier.
                From Scoring on Force Out rules “ no run can be scored during the same continuous playing action as a force out for the third out, even if a runner reaches home plate before the third out is recorded”.

                On a batted ball with two outs the fielders will almost always ignore a runner trying to score, instead forcing out the batter or another runner.
                In your example Gorman was forced out. Him running thru the bag may have surprised you but it didn’t change anything.

                Comment


                  Originally posted by Portbb View Post

                  Because you can’t run more than 3 feet from the base to avoid being tagged? If Gorman ran thru the bag the likelihood of him running less than 3 feet past the second base bag to avoid being tagged is almost nil. Imagine a yardstick around the base. So he’s out. Well before even the speediest runner can score?
                  This assumes Gorman is running straight, but if he has the insight to try this play he would just round the bag as if he’s going to third in which case he won’t be called out for going out of the baseline.

                  I don’t think this play ever gets used. It would only be relevant in a tie game in the 9th inning or later by the home team.
                  Let the kids play.

                  Comment


                    Originally posted by Bub View Post

                    This assumes Gorman is running straight, but if he has the insight to try this play he would just round the bag as if he’s going to third in which case he won’t be called out for going out of the baseline.

                    I don’t think this play ever gets used. It would only be relevant in a tie game in the 9th inning or later by the home team.
                    Smart thought Bub.
                    Sometimes I feel like my sell by date expired yesterday.

                    Comment


                      Originally posted by Bub View Post

                      This assumes Gorman is running straight, but if he has the insight to try this play he would just round the bag as if he’s going to third in which case he won’t be called out for going out of the baseline.

                      I don’t think this play ever gets used. It would only be relevant in a tie game in the 9th inning or later by the home team.
                      Actually, the play that first made me think of this happened several years ago, and it involved the Yankees on the road losing by one run. Bases loaded, 9th inning, down one, Teixeira was the runner at first, I don't remember who was at 3rd but it was someone faster than Teixeira (not hard to do). Grounder up the middle, I forget which infielder got the ball but they had trouble handling it for a minute, then threw to 2nd, where Teixeira gave the standard give-up slide and was out by just a whisker. Game over, Yankees lose. It occurred to me that if he'd run through the bag he'd have been initially safe, and the faster runner from 3rd must have crossed home plate by that time with the run to keep the game alive.

                      I want to say it happened in Minnesota but don't hold me to that.

                      I hid in the clouded wrath of the crowd, when they said "sit down" I stood up.

                      Comment


                        Originally posted by Bub View Post

                        This assumes Gorman is running straight, but if he has the insight to try this play he would just round the bag as if he’s going to third in which case he won’t be called out for going out of the baseline.

                        I don’t think this play ever gets used. It would only be relevant in a tie game in the 9th inning or later by the home team.
                        Probably the collision factor. Gorman is potentially running into the fielder as it is. Whether its the second baseman or shortstop. If he's running fairly hard and turning towards third base in an instant where are those fielders?

                        Comment


                          Originally posted by Portbb View Post

                          From Scoring on Force Out rules “ no run can be scored during the same continuous playing action as a force out for the third out, even if a runner reaches home plate before the third out is recorded”.

                          On a batted ball with two outs the fielders will almost always ignore a runner trying to score, instead forcing out the batter or another runner.
                          In your example Gorman was forced out. Him running thru the bag may have surprised you but it didn’t change anything.
                          The Gorman play, no. But you're quoting the force out rule. Gorman was forced, but if another runner gets there quickly enough to beat the throw, it ceases to be a force out and as soon as he overruns it becomes a tag play, on which the run from third can count.

                          I didn't bring up the Gorman play thinking the run should count. I brought it up because he made the attempt, and I wondered why it wasn't tried more.
                          Last edited by HelloNewman; 06-06-22, 12:33 PM.
                          I hid in the clouded wrath of the crowd, when they said "sit down" I stood up.

                          Comment


                            Originally posted by Portbb View Post

                            Probably the collision factor. Gorman is potentially running into the fielder as it is. Whether its the second baseman or shortstop. If he's running fairly hard and turning towards third base in an instant where are those fielders?
                            In this case the fielder catching the ball should be receiving it like a first baseman, stretched out towards the direction the ball in coming from, and not in the way of the runner. It's just not going to happen though.
                            Let the kids play.

                            Comment


                              This is from wikipedia based on Baseball Almanac so I'm thinking it's correct so here goes- "Note that the second baseman (assume also the shortstop), tagging such a forced runner coming from first for the third out, also prevents scoring by the speedy runner from third as this tag is considered a force out (any out, tag or touching the force base, on a forced runner is a force out).

                              Comment


                                Originally posted by Portbb View Post
                                This is from wikipedia based on Baseball Almanac so I'm thinking it's correct so here goes- "Note that the second baseman (assume also the shortstop), tagging such a forced runner coming from first for the third out, also prevents scoring by the speedy runner from third as this tag is considered a force out (any out, tag or touching the force base, on a forced runner is a force out).
                                That's if he's tagged going from first to second. Once the runner goes past second it's no longer a force play.
                                Let the kids play.

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