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October 13, 2000: Mariano Rivera Breaks Whitey Ford's Scoreless Frames Record

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    October 13, 2000: Mariano Rivera Breaks Whitey Ford's Scoreless Frames Record

    From nationalpastime.com:
    On October 13, 2000, Mariano Rivera, extending his streak to 33.1 innings, breaks the 38 year-old record of Whitey Ford for consecutive scoreless frames in postseason play when the Yankees defeat the Mariners, 8-2, in Game 3 of the ALCS. The Yankees' Hall of Fame lefty had established the record from 1960 to 1962 with 33 innings as a World Series starter
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    Watch Mariano Rivera's Hall of Fame career highlights:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U3suugFqiH0

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    Mariano Rivera passes Whitey Ford for scoreless IP in post season with 33 and 1/3, ALCS game 3, 10/14/2000
    https://marianoriverahighlights.blog...-ford-for.html

    (NOTE: This marianoriverahighlights.blogspot.com was posted on Saturday October 14, 2000 1:14 AM and updated Saturday October 14, 2000 2:53 AM.
    The event occurred Friday night, October 13, 2000.)
    Excerpts from the marianoriverahighlights.blogspot.com article:
    "Rivera became king of the hill Friday night. He broke Whitey Ford's record for consecutive scoreless innings in postseason play, extending his streak to 33 1/3 innings as the Yankees beat Seattle 8-2 in Game 3 of the AL championship series."
    "I didn't think about it at all. It just happens," the New York closer said. "It's important, but it's not about the record, it's about winning."
    "Rivera said he met Ford at spring training in 1993 and has kept in touch with the Yankees Hall of Famer. "I know he played very well, and I'm just happy to be breaking the record as a Yankee because it was a Yankee who held it," he said."
    "Rivera tied Ford's mark of 33 shutout innings -- set for the Yankees in the World Series from 1960-62 -- by breaking pinch-hitter Raul Ibanez's bat on a soft liner in the ninth inning. Last year, Atlanta's Chipper Jones even chuckled as he watched teammate Ryan Klesko break three bats in one plate appearance against Rivera in the World Series.
    "Lean and slightly built, Rivera bears no physical resemblance to big, intimidating relievers of the past and present, guys like Goose Gossage, Lee Smith or Armando Benitez. His results, though, tower above all others. As in, once he comes in, the game's over."
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    Mariano Rivera gets the HOF call
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3gaTm3nzraM

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    Mariano Rivera is inducted into the Hall of Fame
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=13G1bH2o9YA

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    Mariano Rivera delivers perfect inning in final All-Star Game:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xl0_5PVJGHQ

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    Mariano Rivera (Biography):
    https://sabr.org/bioproj/person/mariano-rivera/
    Excerpts from the sabr.org article:

    "Clara Díaz Chacón was a little girl who lived on a street in the fishing village of Puerto Caimito in Panama. A few houses up the road was an elementary school classmate. That boy’s studies ended in the ninth grade, but their paths crossed again when they were teenagers. They became boyfriend and girlfriend, and she was with him when he drove with his family to the airport in Panama City in 1990. Thus he began an adventure that would make him the first unanimous selection to Baseball’s Hall of Fame in Cooperstown. The path was illuminated by their deep religious conviction. Clara and their three sons were with him when he heard the news. His name is Mariano Rivera."
    “It gets to the point where you take him for granted. You never want to assume anything, but for the 12 years I have been here, he’s been the greatest assumption of my life. He has put himself in a place where nobody has ever been.” — Joe Torre, 2007
    "Rivera, in 19 major league seasons, became the all-time leader in saves. He recorded 652 in the regular season plus another 42 in postseason action — converting a superior 89% of his save opportunities at both levels of competition. And he did it essentially relying on one pitch."
    "When Rivera began warming up in the bullpen that evening, coach Mike Borzello was receiving his tosses. Like Mendoza, he could not anticipate the location of the pitch. He even thought that the ball may have been scuffed, but when he used another ball, the action was the same. That evening, Rivera entered the game in the ninth inning and recorded his 23rd save of the season. Over the coming days and weeks, Rivera worked with pitching coach Mel Stottlemyre and the result was a refinement of the cutting action on the ball. As Rivera wrote in The Closer, “As we tinker, I continue to pitch in games (he saved each of the three games in the Detroit series), and the more I throw this new pitch, the more I begin to get command of it. I am starting to throw it for strikes. And this is how my cut fastball, or cutter, is born. It is as if it dropped straight from the heavens.”
    "On January 22, 2019, Mariano Rivera was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in his first appearance on the ballot. Quite in keeping with his peerless career, and as the pitcher who forever defined the role as “closer,” he became the first member of the HOF to be elected unanimously. He received votes on all 425 ballots cast by members of the BBWAA."
    "And the final words go the man whose identity has been and will always be “The Closer.”:
    “I am a simple man who measures his impact by being a humble servant of the Lord and trying to do my best to treat people — and play the game — in the right way.” — Mariano Rivera, 2014.
    "The Yankee is one who, if he once gets his teeth set on a thing, all creation can't make him let go." Ralph Waldo Emerson
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